How to pick the perfect rental flatmate

718

Good flatmates can make or break a rental relationship. While a towel on the floor, dishes left in the sink and visitors at all hours of the day or night might be acceptable every now and then, the long-term strain of an incompatible roommate will take its toll eventually.

Photo: Pexels/pixabay.

Just because they’re your best friend does not necessarily make them excellent roommate potential. Protect your friendships and choose wisely with Rent.com.au’s conversation guide to finding the most suitable roommate.

There are many reasons you might be looking for a new roommate, such as saving money, helping to pay the rent or mortgage or just for company around the house. Having a plan of attack and knowing your rights and responsibilities can make all the difference.

It’s important to go into this discussion knowing what you want out of this relationship. Have a list of house rules and guidelines to present. For example: Will you be sharing the shopping, cooking or laundry duties?

To ensure everyone has a clear and fair understanding of the living arrangements, grab a coffee and run through the following Rent.com.au guide to help you with your quest to find the ideal roommate:

1.       What attracted you to apply for this place?

2.       What qualities are you looking for in a roommate?

3.       What are your hobbies and interests? Do you play sport, music or belong to any clubs?

4.       Where do you work or study? If you’re working, how long have you been in your current role? What are your general hours?

5.       Do you have a partner, friends or family who are likely to visit frequently?

6.       Do you have any pets or pet allergies? (If relevant)

7.       Do you or your partner smoke?

8.       Do you have a car or use public transport? Would you require a parking space?

9.       Do you enjoy cooking? Do you have any food allergies or requirements?

10.     Would you be happy to complete a RentCheck to identify your tenancy history? (If not already completed with your landlord or property manager)

11.    We’re responsible for paying for utility bills, internet and gardening maintenance. Are you happy to contribute to monthly costs?

12.    Do you have any other questions?

If your property manager or landlord wishes to obtain a bond from your new roommate, discuss the benefits of using RentBond to help fast track this process.

Remember that whoever’s name is on the lease will be responsible for the condition of the property and rent payments. This burden can be shared by adding names to the lease.

Chosen well, your next roommate could be your friend for life. For further information on RentBond and RentCheck, visit rent.com.au.

Got a great roommate story? We’d love to hear from you! Share what makes your roommate the best (or the worst) in the comments below.

NO COMMENTS

LEAVE A REPLY