The term ‘pest control’ covers a number of types of animal infestations and outbreaks.

Pests and vermin may become evident in rental properties at some stage during a tenancy. But who is responsible for managing pest control?

pest and vermin control tenancy
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By RENT.COM.AU

Pest control can include:

  • Fleas
  • Cockroaches
  • Ants
  • Spiders (i.e. redbacks)
  • Rats and mice
  • Snakes and possums
  • Bees and wasps
  • White ants

Any (or all) of these pests and vermin may become evident in rental properties at some stage during your lease. But who is responsible for managing pest control? In many states across Australia, the legislation relating to pest control can be unclear, and is often open to interpretation, for example:

It’s also worthwhile noting that many local councils across Australia enforce health and safety bylaws for residential property owners to undertake pest control on an annual basis for pests and vermin, namely cockroaches.

As a general rule, however, any outbreak or infestation of pests such as rats, mice, possums, cockroaches, termites, ants, spiders, wasps or bees requiring attention by a pest control operator is the responsibility of the lessor / property manager.

Tenant responsibilities 

Generally, as a tenant you are responsible for: Pest infestations such as fleas caused by your pets. Prevention of pests by proper storage of food, and by using sprays and baits.

When you first complete your property condition report, you should also check the premises for cleanliness and maintenance issues, including insect pests.

When you vacate a property, it is a condition of your tenancy agreement to undertake flea treatment control.

Property owner responsibilities 

Generally, as a property owner you are responsible for: Pest and vermin control (such as rats, mice and termites). The exception being that the presence of the pest was caused by your tenant’s poor housekeeping or lack of cleanliness. If your tenant has not been disposing of perishable rubbish, or has been undertaking activities which increase the presence of pests, as a property owner you could argue that it is your tenant’s responsibility.

REMEMBER: Many of the listed pests (above) can be eradicated through the use of simple supermarket products (i.e. insect sprays, baits and traps).

If you’re a tenant, and you’re concerned about your safety, make your concerns known to your property owner or property manager.

4 COMMENTS

  1. When it comes to pest control, a number of treatments are done to ensure their complete extermination. Talking about the pest control methodologies, both natural and scientific methods are used. No matter which method you prefer but it is always better to get it executed by the professionals as they effectively know how to make it work.

  2. Can I sue the owner if a pool was taken out and the yard wasn’t up to scratch and I had a really bad fall? Regards Carolyn Smith

    • Hi Carolyn, sorry to hear you’ve had this experience. Hope you’re recovering quickly! Not knowing your situation (and tenancy agreement) intimately, we can’t offer you specific advice. However, if you wish to pursue this further, you should contact your state tenancy body for some general advice on how to best proceed. You can find links to these websites on our ‘Get Support’ section. Just scroll down the page until you spot the maps. https://www.rent.com.au/blog/student-advice Hope this helps you out!

  3. As a property owner, the one responsible for pest control is me, but I have a Property Manager that I can trust, and they are usually the ones who deal with it (since they work in close collaboration with pest control contractors). However, if it’s the tenants who caused the infestation due to neglect, then they are the one who is responsible.

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