The world’s largest abandoned building.

This pyramid-shaped building in North Korea was once a contender for the tallest hotel in the world – but construction was interrupted in 1989 and it became the world’s largest abandoned building instead.

Ryugyong Hotel, North Korea
Ryugyong Hotel, North Korea

By Lidija Grozdanic, cross-posted from Inhabitat 

The notorious 105-story Ryugyong Hotel – frequently referred to as the “Hotel of Doom” – could come to life after all, as Egyptian company Orascom fired the project back up again in 2008.

This pyramid-shaped hotel in North Korea, once a contender for the tallest hotel in the world, has remained unfinished since 1989 and instead became the world's largest abandoned building.
This pyramid-shaped hotel in North Korea, once a contender for the tallest hotel in the world, has remained unfinished since 1989 and instead became the world’s largest abandoned building.

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The structure, designed by Baikdoosan Architects & Engineers, first broke ground in 1987 in Pyongyang, North Korea. It was supposed to open in 1989, two years later after the frame was finished. Work stopped in 1992 after the collapse of the Soviet Union (an ally and backer), and the hotel remained unfinished, looming over the North Korean capital.

The structure, designed by Baikdoosan Architects & Engineers, first broke ground in 1987 in Pyongyang, North Korea. It was supposed to open in 1989, two years later after the frame was finished.
The structure, designed by Baikdoosan Architects & Engineers, first broke ground in 1987 in Pyongyang, North Korea. It was supposed to open in 1989, two years later after the frame was finished.

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In 2008, an Egyptian company took over the hotel and began adding exterior glass in the hope of finishing the project. Reports say that the interior has no plumbing or electricity, and it could require another $2 billion to finish. As of late construction on thehotel has stopped again, leaving the fate of the hotel unresolved.

By Lidija Grozdanic, cross-posted from Inhabitat 

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